HomeDNA™ Healthy Weight

Unlock the secret to achieving a healthy weight today, using insights from your own genetic code

1

£129.00

Overview

Overview

Eliminate the guesswork for getting to and maintaining a healthy weight.

HomeDNA™ Healthy Weight is a scientifically-based weight- management test and program that identifies your unique genetic makeup and provides diet and exercise strategies specifically tailored to your genotype. Just take the simple at-home DNA test and within a few weeks you receive personalized nutrition and fitness recommendations that work best for your body. Get ready to take control of your health.

Kit Contents:

  • Easy-to-follow instructions
  • Cheek swabs for DNA collection
  • Postage-paid envelope for returning samples to the lab (U.S. customers only)

Results Back:

  • Just 6 weeks from receipt of samples at the lab

 

Due to state regulations, currently not available in New York and Maryland. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

View Sample Report

Details

Details

Weight loss is not one-size-fits-all. After you purchase the HomeDNA™ Healthy Weight DNA test, all you need to do is collect a DNA sample from inside your cheek with the swabs provided. Then, after you send your sample to us, our certified and highly-qualified lab examines your DNA and checks it for certain genetic markers connected to your weight, metabolism and body type. Using these genetic markers, we then post a personalised report to your secure account—with specific recommendations based on the results of your genetic test.

With the personalised report you receive from our DNA test, you have essential information you need to tailor a weight-loss program that can achieve real results. Unlike diet books and pre-packaged meal plans, the fitness program created by results of DNA testing can offer customised solutions to help you realise a healthy weight since it’s based on your unique genetic information.

Rather than taking a one-size-fits-all approach to weight loss, the recommendations provided by the Healthy Weight Analysis + Report test are tailored specifically to your body. You can cook smarter, eat healthier, and exercise more effectively because you have data from your DNA to help you make more informed decisions.

Results of your test are posted to your secure online account just 6 weeks after samples arrive at the lab.

Results Include:

  • Detailed analysis of the genetic markers influencing your weight
  • Personalised recommendations for:

    • Foods to eat—the best foods to meet your caloric needs
    • Nutrients—Optimal nutrient needs and most effective supplements

    • Best exercises—Ideal workouts to achieve and maintain your healthiest weight

Fine-Tune Your Fitness Regimen

If you’re going to eat healthier and devote time and effort to exercising, it’s important to take actions to maximise the benefits. DNA testing for health and fitness helps you better plan an individualised workout routine that takes full advantage of your physiological capabilities.

While some people seem to build muscle easily, others run or bike their way into top physical shape. DNA fitness testing can unlock the information that takes the guesswork out of which types of training your body responds to most efficiently. Your DNA is unique, so your DNA fitness profile is too.

Why not take advantage of genetic testing technology to enjoy nutrition, supplement, and fitness suggestions customised just for you?

This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. Genetics are just one factor in overall health—personal habits, environmental influences, and other factors are also contributors.


View Sample Report

When you receive your DNA test results, we recommend reviewing them with your doctor to understand what, if any, lifestyle changes you should make to help you achieve and maintain a healthy weight. This test can supplement your knowledge of your body to help maintain optimal weight and make better lifestyle choices that may improve your overall health.

Before attempting any of the recommendations offered within your DNA report, you should consult with a physician (all categories), licenced professional trainer (exercise category), and/or a dietitian/nutritionist (food/nutrients categories). 

The Science

The Science

The Science Behind the Test

Genetic testing has moved into the mainstream and is the future of preventive health. In addition to the thousands of tests being offered for medical conditions and diseases, the science and research behind genetic testing related to lifestyle and wellness markers has progressed to the point of understanding the specific genes dictating how the human body processes carbohydrates, fat, protein, micronutrients, and more, and how specific genes determine the effectiveness of certain fitness activities.

With the advanced genetic testing technology and scientific understanding of the human genome available today, it is now possible to develop individually-tailored nutrition and exercise programs that are based on and curated to your unique DNA. Only now has the cost of genetic testing come down to the point where it is feasible to use this technology for health management programs offered to the general public.

Programs tailored to an individual’s DNA have proven to be much more effective than generic programs. A recent study published by the European Society of Human Genetics found that dieters employing weight management programs tailored to the individual’s genome lost up to 33% more weight than those following standard, “one size fits all” weight loss programs. With the latest genomic technology, any health management program that does not take an individual’s genetic profile into account is simply guesswork.

The Research

Clinical studies and research on genetic testing related to lifestyle and wellness markers have been rapidly increasing in quality and volume since the human genome was first mapped in 2003. As the testing technology improves and the cost of analyzing an individual’s DNA decreases, more research facilities and universities around the world are able to perform more studies with larger test subject groups, all leading to more being discovered about the connections between genetics and preventive health.

Dr. Mark Sarzynski, a top researcher in the field of exercise genomics, and his team review relevant published research, and update our solution protocols to include newly identified findings so HomeDNA customers have the soundest scientific basis for their weight management recommendations.

See our "Resources" tab for links to related studies. 

How It Works

How It Works

5 Easy Steps to Get your HomeDNA™ Healthy Weight Analysis + Report

  1. BUY KIT: Order your complete DNA test through our online shop today 
  2. REGISTER KIT: Go online to HomeDNA.com and register your kit’s barcode
  3. COLLECT DNA: Use the check swabs found in the kit to collect your DNA and mail the samples to our lab
  4. ANALYSE DNA: You will receive an email when your samples arrive at the lab and our scientific team will extract and process your DNA to analyse the genes
  5. RECEIVE REPORT: You will receive an email within 3 weeks that your personalised report has been uploaded to your secure online account and is ready to view


In addition to your customised report, you can access the online platform anytime, anywhere, to enjoy a comprehensive library of videos, articles, and recipes that are curated specifically for your genotype.

 


FAQs

FAQs

Our lab analyzes genetic markers (SNPS) that have been shown through external research to be related to various ways the human body processes food, nutrients and physical exercise.

Typical turnaround time for getting results is 6 weeks, once samples arrive at the lab. We will email you as soon as your report is ready.

No. There is no need to retake the HomeDNA Healthy Weight test as your genes will never change. In terms of testing DNA, your DNA is the same throughout your entire life. This is a once-in-a-lifetime investment that takes away the guesswork when it comes to dieting and exercise.

Your HomeDNA Healthy Weight report contains nutrition and exercise recommendations specific to your genetic test results (i.e., your DNA). The nutrition information discusses in easy language how much protein, carbohydrates and fat you should consume daily, which nutrients for which you may be at risk of deficiency, and which foods are good sources of those nutrients. You will learn how your body responds to fat, protein and carbohydrate intake in relation to how you use them for energy, and thus, how best to eat in order to lose body fat.

Your HomeDNA Healthy Weight report also indicates how likely you are to use fat for energy during different types of exercise. It will give you specific information about exercises that are best aligned with your genetic test results: which types, at what intensity, for how long, and how often.


No. HomeDNA Healthy Weight focuses solely on those genes that are related to the body’s ability to process food, nutrients and physical exercise. Any DNA test performed to detect predictors for disease should be interpreted by a physician or a certified genetic counselor.

The algorithm used for this test is based on the latest  science. Please see our "Resources" tab for links to studies. 

We have laboratory protocols that ensure very high accuracy, and so you can be sure your test has been processed correctly. Your genes play a big role in your body composition but it’s also important to realize lifestyle and diet play a significant role as well. 

HomeDNA Healthy Weight values the trust you place in us. To prevent unauthorized access or disclosure, to retain data accuracy, and to ensure the use of the information, we use a range of technical, physical and administrative, HIPAA-compliant, measures to protect the information we collect about our members. And your information will never be sold.  View our privacy policy for more information.

Resources

Resources

WEIGHT LOSS ABILITY

Hum Hered. 2013;75(2-4):160-74. doi: 10.1159/000353181. Epub 2013 Sep 27.
Human cardiovascular disease IBC chip-wide association with weight loss and weight regain in the look AHEAD trial.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=24081232
McCaffery JM, Papandonatos GD, Huggins GS, Peter I, Erar B, Kahn SE, Knowler WC, Lipkin EW, Kitabchi AE, Wagenknecht LE, Wing RR; Genetic Subgroup of Look AHEAD; Look AHEAD Research Group

Diabetes. 2012 Nov;61(11):3005-11. doi: 10.2337/db11-1799. Epub 2012 Aug 13.
FTO genotype and 2-year change in body composition and fat distribution in response to weight-loss diets.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=22891219
Zhang X, Qi Q, Zhang C, Smith SR, Hu FB, Sacks FM, Bray GA, Qi L.

Int J Obes (Lond). 2013 Dec;37(12):1545-52. doi: 10.1038/ijo.2013.54. Epub 2013 Apr 3.
FTO predicts weight regain in the Look AHEAD clinical trial.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=23628854
McCaffery JM1, Papandonatos GD, Huggins GS, Peter I, Kahn SE, Knowler WC, Hudnall GE, Lipkin EW, Kitabchi AE, Wagenknecht LE, Wing RR; Genetic Subgroup of Look AHEAD; Look AHEAD Research Group

Diabetes. 2010 Mar;59(3):747-50. doi: 10.2337/db09-1050. Epub 2009 Dec 22.
Gene variants of TCF7L2 influence weight loss and body composition during lifestyle intervention in a population at risk for type 2 diabetes.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=20028944
Haupt A, Thamer C, Heni M, Ketterer C, Machann J, Schick F, Machicao F, Stefan N, Claussen CD, Häring HU, Fritsche A, Staiger H.

Am J Clin Nutr. 2012 Nov;96(5):1129-36. doi: 10.3945/ajcn.112.038125. Epub 2012 Oct 3.
TCF7L2 genetic variants modulate the effect of dietary fat intake on changes in body composition during a weight-loss intervention
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=23034957
Mattei J, Qi Q, Hu FB, Sacks FM, Qi L.

Am J Clin Nutr. 2014 Feb;99(2):392-9. doi: 10.3945/ajcn.113.072066. Epub 2013 Dec 11.
Variants in glucose- and circadian rhythm-related genes affect the response of energy expenditure to weight-loss diets
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=24335056
Mirzaei K, Xu M, Qi Q, de Jonge L, Bray GA, Sacks F, Qi L

Diabetes Care. 2012 Feb;35(2):363-6. doi: 10.2337/dc11-1328. Epub 2011 Dec 16.
Genetic predictors of weight loss and weight regain after intensive lifestyle modification, metformin treatment, or standard care in the Diabetes Prevention Program.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=22179955
Delahanty LM, Pan Q, Jablonski KA, Watson KE, McCaffery JM, Shuldiner A, Kahn SE, Knowler WC, Florez JC, Franks PW; Diabetes Prevention Program Research Group.

Diabetes. 2002 Aug;51(8):2581-6.
Association of the Pro12Ala polymorphism in the PPAR-gamma2 gene with 3-year incidence of type 2 diabetes and body weight change in the Finnish Diabetes Prevention Study.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=12145174
Lindi VI, Uusitupa MI, Lindström J, Louheranta A, Eriksson JG, Valle TT, Hämäläinen H, Ilanne-Parikka P, Keinänen-Kiukaanniemi S, Laakso M, Tuomilehto J; Finnish Diabetes Prevention Study.

Clin Genet. 2003 Feb;63(2):109-16.
The PPAR-gamma P12A polymorphism modulates the relationship between dietary fat intake and components of the metabolic syndrome.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=12145174
Robitaille J, Després JP, Pérusse L, Vohl MC.

Clin Genet. 2003 Feb;63(2):109-16.
Interaction between a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma gene polymorphism and dietary fat intake in relation to body mass.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=14506127
Memisoglu A, Hu FB, Hankinson SE, Manson JE, De Vivo I, Willett WC, Hunter DJ.

FOOD – PROTEIN UTILIZATION

Int J Obes (Lond). 2013 Dec;37(12):1545-52. doi: 10.1038/ijo.2013.54. Epub 2013 Apr 3.
FTO predicts weight regain in the Look AHEAD clinical trial.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=23628854
McCaffery JM1, Papandonatos GD, Huggins GS, Peter I, Kahn SE, Knowler WC, Hudnall GE, Lipkin EW, Kitabchi AE, Wagenknecht LE, Wing RR; Genetic Subgroup of Look AHEAD; Look AHEAD Research Group.

FOOD – FAT UTILIZATION

Diabetes Care. 2012 Feb;35(2):363-6. doi: 10.2337/dc11-1328. Epub 2011 Dec 16.
Genetic predictors of weight loss and weight regain after intensive lifestyle modification, metformin treatment, or standard care in the Diabetes Prevention Program.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=23628854
Delahanty LM, Pan Q, Jablonski KA, Watson KE, McCaffery JM, Shuldiner A, Kahn SE, Knowler WC, Florez JC, Franks PW; Diabetes Prevention Program Research Group.

Diabetes. 2002 Aug;51(8):2581-6.
Association of the Pro12Ala polymorphism in the PPAR-gamma2 gene with 3-year incidence of type 2 diabetes and body weight change in the Finnish Diabetes Prevention Study.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=12145174
Lindi VI, Uusitupa MI, Lindström J, Louheranta A, Eriksson JG, Valle TT, Hämäläinen H, Ilanne-Parikka P, Keinänen-Kiukaanniemi S, Laakso M, Tuomilehto J; Finnish Diabetes Prevention Study

Clin Genet. 2003 Feb;63(2):109-16.
The PPAR-gamma P12A polymorphism modulates the relationship between dietary fat intake and components of the metabolic syndrome.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=12630956
Robitaille J, Després JP, Pérusse L, Vohl MC.

Hum Mol Genet. 2003 Nov 15;12(22):2923-9. Epub 2003 Sep 23.
Interaction between a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma gene polymorphism and dietary fat intake in relation to body mass.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=14506127
Memisoglu A, Hu FB, Hankinson SE, Manson JE, De Vivo I, Willett WC, Hunter DJ.

Am J Clin Nutr. 2012 Nov;96(5):1129-36. doi: 10.3945/ajcn.112.038125. Epub 2012 Oct 3.
TCF7L2 genetic variants modulate the effect of dietary fat intake on changes in body composition during a weight-loss intervention.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=2303495
Mattei J, Qi Q, Hu FB, Sacks FM, Qi L.

Circulation. 2006 May 2;113(17):2062-70. Epub 2006 Apr 24.
Dietary intake of n-6 fatty acids modulates effect of apolipoprotein A5 gene on plasma fasting triglycerides, remnant lipoprotein concentrations, and lipoprotein particle size: the Framingham Heart Study.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=16636175
Lai CQ, Corella D, Demissie S, Cupples LA, Adiconis X, Zhu Y, Parnell LD, Tucker KL, Ordovas JM.

Clin Genet. 2005 Aug;68(2):152-4.
A polymorphism in the apolipoprotein A5 gene is associated with weight loss after short-term diet.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=15996212
Aberle J, Evans D, Beil FU, Seedorf U.

J Mol Med (Berl). 2007 Feb;85(2):119-28. Epub 2007 Jan 9.
APOA5 gene variation modulates the effects of dietary fat intake on body mass index and obesity risk in the Framingham Heart Study.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=17211608
Corella D, Lai CQ, Demissie S, Cupples LA, Manning AK, Tucker KL, Ordovas JM.

J Nutr. 2011 Mar;141(3):380-5. doi: 10.3945/jn.110.130344. Epub 2011 Jan 5.
APOA5 gene variation interacts with dietary fat intake to modulate obesity and circulating triglycerides in a Mediterranean population.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=21209257
Sánchez-Moreno C, Ordovás JM, Smith CE, Baraza JC, Lee YC, Garaulet M.

Circulation. 2013 Mar 26;127(12):1283-9. doi: 10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.112.000586. Epub 2013 Feb 27.
Variants in glucose- and circadian rhythm-r elated genes affect the response of energy expenditure to weight-loss diets: the POUNDS LOST Trial.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=24335056
Mirzaei K, Xu M, Qi Q, de Jonge L, Bray GA, Sacks F, Qi L.

Am J Clin Nutr. 2014 Feb;99(2):392-9. doi: 10.3945/ajcn.113.072066. Epub 2013 Dec 11.
Genetic determinant for amino acid metabolites and changes in body weight and insulin resistance in response to weight-loss diets: the Preventing Overweight Using Novel Dietary Strategies (POUNDS LOST trial.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=23446828
Xu M, Qi Q, Liang J, Bray GA, Hu FB, Sacks FM, Qi L.

FOOD - CARB UTILIZATION

Circulation. 2011 Aug 2;124(5):563-71. doi: 10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.111.025767. Epub 2011 Jul 11.
Insulin receptor substrate 1 gene variation modifies insulin resistance response to weight-loss diets in a 2-year randomized trial.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=21747052
Qi Q, Bray GA, Smith SR, Hu FB, Sacks FM, Qi L.

NUTRIENTS - VITAMIN B9 - FOLATE TENDENCY

Proc Nutr Soc. 2014 Feb;73(1):47-56. doi: 10.1017/S0029665113003613. Epub 2013 Oct 17.
MTHFR 677TT genotype and disease risk: is there a modulating role for B-vitamins?
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=24131523
Reilly R, McNulty H1, Pentieva K, Strain JJ, Ward M.

NUTRIENTS - VITAMIN A TENDENCY

FASEB J. 2009 Apr;23(4):1041-53. doi: 10.1096/fj.08-121962. Epub 2008 Dec 22.
Two common single nucleotide polymorphisms in the gene encoding beta-carotene 15,15’-monoxygenase alter beta-carotene metabolism in female volunteers.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=19103647
Leung WC, Hessel S, Méplan C, Flint J, Oberhauser V, Tourniaire F, Hesketh JE, von Lintig J, Lietz G.

NUTRIENTS - VITAMIN B6TENDENCY

Am J Hum Genet. 2009 Apr;84(4):477-82. doi: 10.1016/j.ajhg.2009.02.011. Epub 2009 Mar 19.
Genome-wide association study of vitamin B6, vitamin B12, folate, and homocysteine blood concentrations.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=19303062
Tanaka T, Scheet P, Giusti B, Bandinelli S, Piras MG, Usala G, Lai S, Mulas A, Corsi AM, Vestrini A, So i F, Gori AM, Abbate R, Guralnik J, Singleton A, Abecasis GR, Schlessinger D, Uda M, Ferrucci L.

NUTRIENTS - VITAMIN B12TENDENCY

Nat Genet. 2008 Oct;40(10):1160-2. doi: 10.1038/ng.210. Epub 2008 Sep 7.
Common variants of FUT2 are associated with plasma vitamin B12 levels.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=18776911
Hazra A, Kraft P, Selhub J, Giovannucci EL, Thomas G, Hoover RN, Chanock SJ, Hunter DJ.

Am J Hum Genet. 2009 Apr;84(4):477-82. doi: 10.1016/j.ajhg.2009.02.011. Epub 2009 Mar 19.
Genome-wide association study of vitamin B6, vitamin B12, folate, and homocysteine blood concentrations.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=19303062
Tanaka T, Scheet P, Giusti B, Bandinelli S, Piras MG, Usala G, Lai S, Mulas A, Corsi AM, Vestrini A, So i F, Gori AM, Abbate R, Guralnik J, Singleton A, Abecasis GR, Schlessinger D, Uda M, Ferrucci L.

NUTRIENTS - VITAMIN C TENDENCY

Am J Clin Nutr. 2010 Aug;92(2):375-82. doi: 10.3945/ajcn.2010.29438. Epub 2010 Jun 2.
Genetic variation at the SLC23A1 locus is associated with circulating concentrations of L-ascorbic acid (vitamin C : evidence from 5 independent studies with >15,000 participants.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=20519558
Timpson NJ, Forouhi NG, Brion MJ, Harbord RM, Cook DG, Johnson P, McConnachie A, Morris RW, Rodriguez S, Luan J, Ebrahim S, Padmanabhan S, Watt G, Bruckdorfer KR, Wareham NJ, Whincup PH, Chanock S, Sattar N, Lawlor DA, Davey Smith G.

NUTRIENTS - VITAMIN D TENDENCY

Lancet. 2010 Jul 17;376(9736):180-8. doi: 10.1016/S0140-6736(10)60588-0. Epub 2010 Jun 10.
Common genetic determinants of vitamin D insufficiency: a genome-wide association study.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=20541252
Wang TJ, Zhang F, Richards JB, Kestenbaum B, van Meurs JB, Berry D, Kiel DP, Streeten EA, Ohlsson C, Koller DL, Peltonen L,Cooper JD, O’Reilly PF, Houston DK, Glazer NL, Vandenput L, Peacock M, Shi J, Rivadeneira F, McCarthy MI, Anneli P, de Boer IH,Mangino M, Kato B, Smyth DJ, Booth SL, Jacques PF, Burke GL, Goodarzi M, Cheung CL, Wolf M, Rice K, Goltzman D, Hidiroglou N, Ladouceur M, Wareham NJ, Hocking LJ, Hart D, Arden NK, Cooper C, Malik S, Fraser WD, Hartikainen AL, Zhai G, Macdonald HM, Forouhi NG, Loos RJ, Reid DM, Hakim A, Dennison E, Liu Y, Power C, Stevens HE, Jaana L, Vasan RS, Soranzo N, Bojunga J,Psaty BM, Lorentzon M, Foroud T, Harris TB, Hofman A, Jansson JO, Cauley JA, Uitterlinden AG, Gibson Q, Järvelin MR, Karasik D, Siscovick DS, Econs MJ, Kritchevsky SB, Florez JC, Todd JA, Dupuis J, Hyppönen E, Spector TD.

EXERCISE - FAT RESPONSE TO CARDIO

J Appl Physiol (1985). 2001 Sep;91(3):1334-40.
Evidence of LPL gene-exercise interaction for body fat and LPL activity : the HERITAGE Family Study.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11509533
Garenc C, Pérusse L, Bergeron J, Gagnon J, Chagnon YC, Borecki IB, Leon AS, Skinner JS, Wilmore JH, Rao DC, Bouchard C.

Obes Res. 2003 May;11(5):612-8.
Effects of beta2-adrenergic receptor gene variants on adiposity: the HERITAGE Family Study.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12740450
Garenc C, Pérusse L, Chagnon YC, Rankinen T, Gagnon J, Borecki IB, Leon AS, Skinner JS, Wilmore JH, Rao DC, Bouchard C; HERITAGE Family Study

EXERCISE - FITNESS RESPONSE TO CARDIO

Physiol Genomics. 2003 Jul 7;14(2):161-6.
Associations between cardiorespiratory responses to exercise and the C34T AMPD1 gene polymorphism in the HERITAGE Family Study.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12783984
Rico-Sanz J, Rankinen T, Joanisse DR, Leon AS, Skinner JS, Wilmore JH, Rao DC, Bouchard C; HERITAGE Family study.

Metabolism. 2004 Feb;53(2):193-202.
Apolipoprotein E genotype and changes in serum lipids and maximal oxygen uptake with exercise training.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14767871
Thompson PD, Tsongalis GJ, Seip RL, Bilbie C, Miles M, Zoeller R, Visich P, Gordon P, Angelopoulos TJ, Pescatello L, Bausserman L, Moyna N.

Metabolism. 2004 Jan;53(1):108-16.
Association of apolipoprotein E polymorphism with blood lipids and maximal oxygen uptake in the sedentary state and after exercise training in the HERITAGE family study.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14681851
Leon AS, Togashi K, Rankinen T, Després JP, Rao DC, Skinner JS, Wilmore JH, Bouchard C

EXERCISE - BODY COMPOSITION RESPONSE TO STRENGTH TRAINING

International Journal of Obesity (2015) 39, 1371–1375; doi:10.1038/ijo.2015.78; published online 26 May 2015
High genetic risk individuals benefit less from resistance exercise intervention
http://www.nature.com/ijo/journal/v39/n9/abs/ijo201578a.html
Y C Klimentidis, J W Bea, T Lohman, P-S Hsieh, S Going and Z Chen

EXERCISE - HDL RESPONSE TO CARDIO

Metabolism. 2004 Jan;53(1):108-16.
Association of apolipoprotein E polymorphism with blood lipids and maximal oxygen uptake in the sedentary state and after exercise training in the HERITAGE family study.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14681851
Leon AS, Togashi K, Rankinen T, Després JP, Rao DC, Skinner JS, Wilmore JH, Bouchard C.

EXERCISE - INSULIN SENSITIVITY RESPONSE TO CARDIO

Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab. 2005 Jun;288(6):E1168-78. Epub 2005 Feb 1.
Endurance training-induced changes in insulin sensitivity and gene expression.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15687108
Teran-Garcia M, Rankinen T, Koza RA, Rao DC, Bouchard C.

Diabetes. 2005 Jul;54(7):2251-5.
Hepatic lipase gene variant -514C>T is associated with lipoprotein and insulin sensitivity response to regular exercise: the HERITAGE Family Study.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15983229
Teran-Garcia M, Santoro N, Rankinen T, Bergeron J, Rice T, Leon AS, Rao DC, Skinner JS, Bergman RN, Després JP, Bouchard C; HERITAGE Family Study.

EXERCISE - GLUCOSE RESPONSE TO CARDIO

Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab. 2005 Jun;288(6):E1168-78. Epub 2005 Feb 1.
Influence of Pro12Ala peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma2 polymorphism on glucose response to exercise training in type 2 diabetes.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15986237
Adamo KB, Sigal RJ, Williams K, Kenny G, Prud’homme D, Tesson F.

Diabetologia. 2010 Apr;53(4):679-89. doi: 10.1007/s00125-009-1630-2. Epub 2009 Dec 31.
Improvements in glucose homeostasis in response to regular exercise are influenced by the PPARG Pro12Ala variant: results from the HERITAGE Family Study.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20043145
Ruchat SM, Rankinen T, Weisnagel SJ, Rice T, Rao DC, Bergman RN, Bouchard C, Pérusse L.

Metabolism. 2003 Feb;52(2):209-12.
PPARgamma gene polymorphism is associated with exercise-mediated changes of insulin resistance in healthy men.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12601634
Kahara T, Takamura T, Hayakawa T, Nagai Y, Yamaguchi H, Katsuki T, Katsuki K, Katsuki M, Kobayashi K.

About This Brand

About This Brand

HomeDNA™ empowers you with valuable information contained in your own DNA. This targeted selection of easy, at-home genetic tests will help you make better health and wellness choices and provide important answers about family relationships both past and present. Brought to you by DNA Diagnostics Centre (DDC), this innovative product line includes:


  • HomeDNA™ Ancestry Analysis + Report
  • Home DNA™ Healthy Weight Analysis + Report
  • HomeDNA™ Paternity Analysis + Report
  • HomeDNA™ Skin Care Analysis + Report


Established in 1995, DDC was founded on the belief that technological advancements in DNA testing should translate to services that are accessible and affordable to everyone. We have built an international reputation based on our commitment to reliability, innovation, and value by offering DNA testing services for paternity and other family relationships, forensics, animal breeders and veterinarians, and now health-conscious clients. DDC's laboratory  is nationally and internationally recognised through multiple accreditations. 


As an industry leader in DNA testing we offer:


  • A fully-accredited laboratory with state-of-the-art technology and robotics to ensure accuracy
  • A large team of expert PhDs to conduct results screening, testing, and research
  • A secured facility with established screening protocols to guarantee privacy and security


For over 20 years, we have earned the trust of our customers by carefully handling more than 10 million DNA samples. Your sensitive DNA test results always remain confidential, and we will not sell your personal data to third parties. DDC is the DNA testing laboratory trusted around the world.

HomeDNA™ Healthy Weight is rated 4.4 out of 5 by 27.
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Very informative I bought this product to find out why I was having a difficult time losing weight, even following a healthy balanced diet. As it turns out there are a couple of nutritional reasons I may be having a difficult time. Having my DNA Healthy Weight profile done has allowed me to consult with my doctor to change and monitor my weight loss program in a whole different dimension. I have been following the suggested daily menu for only 1 week. I have not lost a tremendous amount of weight yet, but I feel so much better and so much more healthy. I am confident I will be able to reach my weight loss goals, and become a much healthier person in the long run.
Date published: 2018-01-30
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Interesting results! I have such a hard time losing weight that I figured this might be a good way to figure out why so I could stop spending money on diet programs. The results were very interesting. At my age (73) I think that the exercises were a little too much but it was interesting to learn which exercises are more beneficial to me. The recommended diet was interesting but with my medical problems there is no way I can follow it. I think learning how your body handles carbs, fat and proteins was also valuable. Learning which nutrients were low and what was normal also helps. The results came back quicker than I expected.
Date published: 2018-04-12
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Worth it I liked this product and the details they included. I did, however, disagree with some of it. It says I utilize fats poorly and carbs well, and also said I should be eating up to 300 g of carbs a day. I have always had success losing weight with low carb diets. Although the other information did add up, in my opinion. The most crucial info was the vitamin utilization and what you need to make sure you supplement.
Date published: 2018-02-05
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Helpful information When I saw this advertised I thought it would be a great asset to help me judge what I needed to do to help me lose weight. After receiving the results, I was surprised to find how extensive it was in detailing what I was deficient in and what nutrients my body had an abundance of. This definitely will help me approach my weight loss goals in the future.
Date published: 2018-01-01
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Interesting Use of DNA I liked the ancestry DNA product and was intrigued by the healthy weight product. I looked around at other DNA products and decided to do this one partially based on price and reviews I had read. The report is very thorough. Diet plans and exercise plans are given. I will be reviewing all of this with my trainer and see how we can adjust what I am doing.
Date published: 2017-10-18
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Informative I have not had time to put the findings into practice yet, and I am still trying to make sense of them. Although some questions have been answered already, for example why my doctor says I am low on Vitamin D ... the only problem I have is that my FOOD items include animal products, and I am a vegan. So it might be good to include that as part of your initial data gathering about the person ... Check back with me in a few months and I can let you know if the putting the results into practice made any difference.
Date published: 2017-11-01
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Could not be happier I purchased this kit the first week of November and I was told my results would not be available until December 22. To my surprise I received my results faster!!! I am able to know what will work for me best! Thank you Home DNA
Date published: 2017-11-30
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Great Information! Wonderful product! Some of the info. I already knew, however much more detailed info and some great food and workout recommendation! Definitely recommend!
Date published: 2017-11-30
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